Vaga Fertur Avis

No me tenet vincula, no me tenet clavis.

Czech Hurricane pilot, RAF

Czech Hurricane pilot, RAF

Czech Spitfire pilot, RAF

Czech Spitfire pilot, RAF

babiesareyum:

"A member of the Scottish National Antarctic Expedition plays the bagpipe for an indifferent penguin, 1904."

Reblogged from reversor

babiesareyum:

"A member of the Scottish National Antarctic Expedition plays the bagpipe for an indifferent penguin, 1904."

undr:

Ernie Sisto. The Greatest Show. 1946

Reblogged from reversor

undr:

Ernie Sisto. The Greatest Show. 1946

rwa42:


In the late 1880s, the body of a 16-year-old girl was pulled from the Seine. She was apparently a suicide, as her body showed no marks of violence, but her beauty and her enigmatic smile led a Paris pathologist to order a plaster death mask of her face.
In the romantic atmosphere of fin de siècle Europe, the girl’s face became an ideal of feminine beauty. The protagonist of Rainer Maria Rilke’s 1910 novel The Notebooks of Malte Laurids Brigge writes, “The mouleur, whose shop I pass every day, has hung two plaster masks beside his door. [One is] the face of the young drowned woman, which they took a cast of in the morgue, because it was beautiful, because it smiled, because it smiled so deceptively, as if it knew.”
Ironically, in 1958 the anonymous girl’s features were used to model the first-aid mannequin Rescue Annie, on which thousands of students have practiced CPR. Though the girl’s identity remains a mystery, her face, it’s said, has become “the most kissed face of all time.”
Whoa.

Reblogged from beautifulcentury

rwa42:

In the late 1880s, the body of a 16-year-old girl was pulled from the Seine. She was apparently a suicide, as her body showed no marks of violence, but her beauty and her enigmatic smile led a Paris pathologist to order a plaster death mask of her face.

In the romantic atmosphere of fin de siècle Europe, the girl’s face became an ideal of feminine beauty. The protagonist of Rainer Maria Rilke’s 1910 novel The Notebooks of Malte Laurids Brigge writes, “The mouleur, whose shop I pass every day, has hung two plaster masks beside his door. [One is] the face of the young drowned woman, which they took a cast of in the morgue, because it was beautiful, because it smiled, because it smiled so deceptively, as if it knew.”

Ironically, in 1958 the anonymous girl’s features were used to model the first-aid mannequin Rescue Annie, on which thousands of students have practiced CPR. Though the girl’s identity remains a mystery, her face, it’s said, has become “the most kissed face of all time.”

Whoa.

greeneyes55:

Paris 1950
Photo: Izis 

Reblogged from lydia-boudica

greeneyes55:

Paris 1950

Photo: Izis 

tragos:


"Life is neither disgusting nor divine. But it’s original!"
[La vita non è né brutta né bella, ma è originale!]

— Italo Svevo, La coscienza di Zeno, Baldini Castoldi Dalai, 2009, p. 391, my translation
Scriveners’ Birthdays: Italo Svevo
Happy Birthday to Italo Svevo, who turned 149 today!
To quit smoking is to understand how life zigs and zags, not as tragedy, but as broken comedy. The Italian author Italo Svevo wrote a novel about these twists and turns of self-imposed fate that the cigarette somehow both symbolizes and inspires.
Svevo’s hero (I insist on using that term) is Zeno Cosini, who, on the advice of his psychiatrist, decides to write an autobiography: the memoirs of a “sick” man yearning to kick the habit and love of his life: smoking.
His life is one long succession of “last cigarettes,” each consumed with a reverential sense of pleasure and self-abnegation. Cosini comes to understand that sickness is a function of life’s artificial prolongation. The vitiating effects of technology and medicine trump our woebegone devotions to health, fitness and the medicinal way.
In a very Svevovian sense, I can say that Zeno’s Conscience is an unmitigated pleasure: one you should deny yourself no further. Cosini is one of the funniest characters you’ll begrudgingly love, and a model of inspirational anti-health.
(Fun trivia: James Joyce was Svevo’s English tutor in Trieste.)

Reblogged from tragos

tragos:

"Life is neither disgusting nor divine. But it’s original!"

[La vita non è né brutta né bella, ma è originale!]

— Italo Svevo, La coscienza di Zeno, Baldini Castoldi Dalai, 2009, p. 391, my translation

Scriveners’ Birthdays: Italo Svevo

Happy Birthday to Italo Svevo, who turned 149 today!

To quit smoking is to understand how life zigs and zags, not as tragedy, but as broken comedy. The Italian author Italo Svevo wrote a novel about these twists and turns of self-imposed fate that the cigarette somehow both symbolizes and inspires.

Svevo’s hero (I insist on using that term) is Zeno Cosini, who, on the advice of his psychiatrist, decides to write an autobiography: the memoirs of a “sick” man yearning to kick the habit and love of his life: smoking.

His life is one long succession of “last cigarettes,” each consumed with a reverential sense of pleasure and self-abnegation. Cosini comes to understand that sickness is a function of life’s artificial prolongation. The vitiating effects of technology and medicine trump our woebegone devotions to health, fitness and the medicinal way.

In a very Svevovian sense, I can say that Zeno’s Conscience is an unmitigated pleasure: one you should deny yourself no further. Cosini is one of the funniest characters you’ll begrudgingly love, and a model of inspirational anti-health.

(Fun trivia: James Joyce was Svevo’s English tutor in Trieste.)

The Inuit: Life As It Was

The Inuit: Life As It Was

The Inuit: Life As It Was

The Inuit: Life As It Was

The Inuit: Life As It Was

The Inuit: Life As It Was

The Inuit - Life As It Was

The Inuit - Life As It Was

alrlo:

Monterrey, Mexico // Subway

Reblogged from freebart

alrlo:

Monterrey, Mexico // Subway

castaroundvintage:


Ione Bright, 1912.

Reblogged from beautifulcentury

castaroundvintage:

Ione Bright, 1912.

(Source: content.lib.washington.edu)

parlatorio:


Louis Armstrong plays for his wife in front of the Sphinx by the pyramids in Giza, 1961

Reblogged from parlatorio

parlatorio:

Louis Armstrong plays for his wife in front of the Sphinx by the pyramids in Giza, 1961

wehadfacesthen:

Brooklyn, New York 1940s
via family-of-crime

Reblogged from reversor

wehadfacesthen:

Brooklyn, New York 1940s

via family-of-crime